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Gavis Transition Policy Moving From Development Assistance To Domestic Financing Of Immunization Programs

Author: Judith Kallenberg, Wilson Mok, Robert Newman, Aurélia Nguyen, Theresa Ryckman, Helen Saxenian, Paul Wilson
$15.00

Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, was created in 2000 to accelerate the introduction of new and underused vaccines in lower-income countries. The period 2000–15 was marked by the rapid uptake of new vaccines in more than seventy countries eligible for Gavi support. To stay focused on the poorest countries, Gavi’s support phases out after countries’ gross national income per capita surpasses a set threshold, which requires governments to assume responsibility for the continued financing of vaccines introduced with Gavi support. Gavi’s funding will end in the period 2016–20 for nineteen countries that have exceeded the eligibility threshold. To avoid disrupting lifesaving immunization programs and to ensure the long-term sustainable impact of Gavi’s investments, it is vital that governments succeed in transitioning from development assistance to domestic financing of immunization programs. This article discusses some of the challenges facing countries currently transitioning out of Gavi support, how Gavi’s policies have evolved to help manage the risks involved in this process, and the lessons learned from this experience.

Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, was created in 2000 to accelerate the introduction of new and underused vaccines in lower-income countries. The period 2000–15 was marked by the rapid uptake of new vaccines in more than seventy countries eligible for Gavi support. To stay focused on the poorest countries, Gavi’s support phases out after countries’ gross national income per capita surpasses a set threshold, which requires governments to assume responsibility for the continued financing of vaccines introduced with Gavi support. Gavi’s funding will end in the period 2016–20 for nineteen countries that have exceeded the eligibility threshold. To avoid disrupting lifesaving immunization programs and to ensure the long-term sustainable impact of Gavi’s investments, it is vital that governments succeed in transitioning from development assistance to domestic financing of immunization programs. This article discusses some of the challenges facing countries currently transitioning out of Gavi support, how Gavi’s policies have evolved to help manage the risks involved in this process, and the lessons learned from this experience.

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